Assembling Life by David Deamer audiobook

Assembling Life: How Can Life Begin on Earth and Other Habitable Planets?

By David Deamer
Read by Stephen R. Thorne

Highbridge Audio, HighBridge

Unabridged

Format : Library CD (In Stock)
  • ISBN: 9781665125710

  • ISBN: 9781665125697

  • ISBN: 9781665125703

Runtime: 7.68 Hours
Category: Nonfiction/Science
Audience: Adult
Language: English

Summary

Summary

In Assembling Life, David Deamer addresses questions that are the cutting edge of research on the origin of life. For instance, how did non-living organic compounds assemble into the first forms of primitive cellular life? What was the source of those compounds and the energy that produced the first nucleic acids? Did life begin in the ocean or in fresh water on terrestrial land masses? Could life have begun on Mars?

The book provides an overview of conditions on the early Earth four billion years ago and explains why fresh water hot springs are a plausible alternative to salty seawater as a site where life can begin. Deamer describes his studies of organic compounds that were likely to be available in the prebiotic environment and the volcanic conditions that can drive chemical evolution toward the origin of life. The book is not exclusively Earth-centric, but instead considers whether life could begin elsewhere in our solar system. Deamer does not propose how life did begin, because we can never know that with certainty. Instead, his goal is to understand how life can begin on any habitable planet, with Earth so far being the only known example.

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Reviews

Author

Author Bio: David Deamer

Author Bio: David Deamer

David Deamer is Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California (Santa Cruz). He recently published First Life: Discovering the Connections Between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began. Deamer’s primary research interest focuses on nucleic acid molecules as they are driven electrophoretically through a nanoscopic channel, or nanopore, embedded in a lipid-bilayer membrane. The presence of the polynucleotide in the channel affects the ionic conductance in a manner related to chain length, concentration and base sequence. This observation has considerable potential for characterizing DNA and RNA in microscopic volumes of nucleic acid solutions. In 2014, Oxford Nanopore Technology introduced the MinION, a portable nanopore sequencing instrument that is now undergoing testing by early users. These include NASA scientists who will send MinIONs to the International Space Station.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, Library CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/Science
Runtime: 7.68
Audience: Adult
Language: English