Lovelock (audiobook)

The Mayflower Trilogy, book 1

Read by Emily Rankin
11.8 hrs • 10 CDs• 1 MP3 CD • Unabridged
Fiction/Science Fiction
Target Audience: Adult
Release Date: 05/15/13
FORMAT PURCHASED RELEASE ISBN PRICE ADD TO CART
Library CD Library Edition CD titles are packaged in an attractive, full-sized, durable vinyl case with full color art. Cloth Sleeves keep compact discs protected and in numerical order. 
- 05/15/13 9781482910971
$105.00
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MP3 CD MP3-CDs: Come in a durable vinyl case similar to a dvd case. An index of contents and tracking information are included within the Mp3-CD format. MP3's can be played on any compatible CD player 
- 05/15/13 9781482910940
$29.95
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Summary

Orson Scott Card, bestselling author of Ender’s Game, teams up with Kathryn H. Kidd to launch an epic science fiction saga of space exploration—and a dramatic conflict between human and nonhuman intelligence.

On the Ark, a colony ship bound outward across the stars, not everyone is a volunteer—or even human. Lovelock is a capuchin monkey engineered from conception to be the perfect servant: intelligent, agile, and devoted to his owner. He is a “witness,” privileged to spend his days and nights recording the life of one of Earth’s most brilliant scientists via digital devices implanted behind his eyes.

But Lovelock is something special among witnesses. He’s a little smarter than most humans: smart enough to break through some of his conditioning, smart enough to feel the bonds of slavery—and want freedom.

Set against the awesome scope of interstellar space, and like Speaker for the Dead and Xenocide before it, Lovelock probes the provocative interface between humanity and another sentient species.

Review Quotes

“Card and Kidd’s passionate depiction of Lovelock’s plight, as well as their insightful portrayal of the various human characters, makes for a gripping read.”

Publishers Weekly

“A penetrating exploration of inalienable rights in a story that gives ‘humanistic’ beliefs an unusual twist.”

Library Journal