Rabid (audiobook)

A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus

8.1 hrs • 7 CDs• 1 MP3 CD • Unabridged
Nonfiction
Target Audience: Adult
Release Date: 07/19/12
FORMAT PURCHASED RELEASE ISBN MARC PRICE ADD TO CART
Library CD Library Edition CD titles are packaged in an attractive, full-sized, durable vinyl case with full color art. Cloth Sleeves keep compact discs protected and in numerical order. 
- 07/19/12 9781470826420
$76.00
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MP3 CD MP3-CDs: Come in a durable vinyl case similar to a dvd case. An index of contents and tracking information are included within the Mp3-CD format. MP3's can be played on any compatible CD player 
- 07/19/12 9781470826444
$29.95
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Playaway Playaway: Playaway editions are a pre loaded audio device that is half the size of deck of cards. Simply plugin headphones and listen. 
- 09/01/12 9781470826468
$59.99
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Summary

A Publishers Weekly Pick of the Week, July 2012

An engrossing and lively history of the fearsome and mythologized virus

In the tradition of The Emperor of All Maladies and The Great Influenza, journalist Bill Wasik and veterinarian Monica Murphy chart the history, science, and cultural mythology of rabies. In the absence of vaccination— as was true for thousands of years, until the late nineteenth century—the rabies virus caused brain infections with a nearly 100 percent fatality rate, both in animals and humans, and the suffering it inflicted became the stuff of legend.

The transmission of the virus—often from rabid dog to man—reawakened a primal fear of wild animals, and the illness’s violent symptoms spoke directly to mankind’s fear of the beast within. The cultural response was to create fictional embodiments of those anxieties—ravenous wolfmen, bloodsucking vampires, and armies of mindless zombies.

From the myth of Actaeon to Saint Hubert, from the laboratories of the heroic and pioneering Louis Pasteur to a journalistic investigation into the madness that has gripped modern Bali, Rabid is a fresh, fascinating, and often wildly entertaining look at one of the world’s most misunderstood viruses.

Review Quotes

“An elegant exploration of the science behind one of the most horrible ways to die.”

Chris Anderson, New York Times bestselling author

“[An] ambitious and smart history of the virus…The authors track how science tried to tame the scourge, with its ravaging neurological effects. Yet the rare tales of modern survivors only underscore that, despite the existence of treatment through a series of injections, we’re at a stalemate in conquering rabies.”

Publishers Weekly

“[Wasik and Murphy] place the world’s deadliest virus in its historical and cultural context with a scientifically sound and compelling history that begins in ancient Mesopotamia and ends in twenty-first-century Bali…Readable, fascinating, informative, and occasionally gruesome, this is highly recommended for anyone interested in medical history or the cultural history of disease.”

Library Journal

“Journalist husband and veterinarian wife tell the story of one of humanity’s biggest nightmares, the disease that turns man’s best friend against him, rabies…Their enlightening account of a 2008 outbreak in previously rabies-free Bali naturally leads to the quandary they present in conclusion, namely, that rabies might be eliminated if it weren’t so rare nowadays and so expensive to prevent. Riveting medical reading.” 

Booklist

“Thrilling, smart, and devilishly entertaining, Rabid is one of those books that changes your sense of history—and reminds us how much our human story has been shaped by the viruses that live among us.”

Steven Johnson, bestselling author of The Ghost Map

“Take Bill Wasik, one of our most perceptive journalistic storytellers, have him join forces with Monica Murphy, scholar of public health, and you end up with this erudite, true-life creep show of a book. It turns out that the rabies virus is a good bit more fascinating and at least as frightening as any of those blood-thirsty monsters that have stalked our fairy tales, multiplexes, and dreams.”

Donovan Hohn, author of Moby-Duck

“The rabies virus is a microscopic particle of genes and proteins. And yet it has cast a fearful shadow over all of human history. Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy have produced an eerily elegant meditation on disease and madness, dogs and vampires. It’s as infectious as its subject.”

Carl Zimmer, NPR contributor and author of Parasite Rex

“From a husband-and-wife team, a literate look at the history of one of humankind’s oldest and most frightening scourges…Surprisingly fun reading about a fascinating malady.”

Kirkus Reviews