The Best of America by Washington Irving audiobook

The Best of America: Seven Classic Short Stories

Stories by Washington Irving , Nathaniel Hawthorne , Edgar Allan Poe , and others
Read by various narrators

Blackstone Publishing, Blackstone Publishing

Unabridged

Format : Library CD (In Stock)
  • ISBN: 9781620640449

  • ISBN: 9781982674205

  • ISBN: 9781982674212

Runtime: 3.68 Hours
Category: Fiction/Classics
Audience: Adult
Language: English

Summary

Summary

This anthology of unabridged short stories represents some of the most significant works from the most influential American authors of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Included are Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving, Young Goodman Brown by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe, Mermaids by Louisa May Alcott, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County by Mark Twain, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce, and The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry.

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Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Washington Irving

Author Bio: Washington Irving

Washinton Irving (1783–1859), American essayist, novelist, and historian, was born in New York to a wealthy merchant. He studied law, but because of his delicate health, his family sent him on a tour of Europe, where he collected material later used in his stories and essays. The first American author to achieve international fame, his literary career served in many ways to consolidate the cultures of the United States and Europe.

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Author Bio: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Author Bio: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804–1864) is considered to be one of the greatest American authors of the nineteenth century. He was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and made his ambition to be a writer while still a teenager. He graduated from Bowdoin College in Maine, where the poet Longfellow was also a student, and spent several years traveling in New England and writing short stories before his best known novel, The Scarlet Letter, was published in 1850. His writing was not at first financially rewarding, and he worked as measurer and surveyor in the Boston and Salem Custom Houses. In 1853 he was sent to Liverpool as American consul and then lived in Italy before returning to the United States in 1860.

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Author Bio: Edgar Allan Poe

Author Bio: Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1848) transformed the American literary landscape with his innovations in the short story genre and his haunting lyrical poetry, and he is credited with inventing American gothic horror and detective fiction. He was first published in 1827 and then began a career as a magazine writer and editor and a sharp literary critic. In 1845 the publication of his most famous poem, “The Raven,” brought him national fame.

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Author Bio: Louisa May Alcott

Author Bio: Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (1832–1888) was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania. Educated by her father until she was sixteen, she also studied under Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Theodore Parker. A prolific writer, her most famous work was Little Women, a timeless American classic.

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Author Bio: Mark Twain

Author Bio: Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

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Author Bio: Ambrose Bierce

Author Bio: Ambrose Bierce

Ambrose Bierce (1842–ca. 1914) was an American journalist, short-story writer, and poet. Born in Ohio, he served in the Civil War and then settled in San Francisco. He wrote for Hearst’s Examiner, his wit and satire making him the literary dictator of the Pacific coast and strongly influencing many writers. He disappeared into war-torn Mexico in 1913.

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Author Bio: O. Henry

Author Bio: O. Henry

O. Henry (1862–1910), born William Sydney Porter in Greensboro, North Carolina, was a short-story writer whose tales romanticized the commonplace, in particular, the lives of ordinary people in New York City. His stories often had surprise endings, a device that became identified with his name. He began writing sketches around 1887, and his stories of adventure in the Southwest United States and in Central America were immediately popular with magazine readers.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD, Library CD, MP3 CD
Category: Fiction/Classics
Runtime: 3.68
Audience: Adult
Language: English