The Blood Spilt (audiobook)

The Rebecka Martinsson Series, book 2

Translated by Marlaine Delargy
11.2 hrs • 9 CDs• 1 MP3 CD • Unabridged
Fiction/Mystery & Detective
Target Audience: Adult
Release Date: 02/01/07
FORMAT PURCHASED RELEASE ISBN PRICE ADD TO CART
Library CD Library Edition CD titles are packaged in an attractive, full-sized, durable vinyl case with full color art. Cloth Sleeves keep compact discs protected and in numerical order. 
- 02/01/07 9780786161829
$99.00
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MP3 CD MP3-CDs: Come in a durable vinyl case similar to a dvd case. An index of contents and tracking information are included within the Mp3-CD format. MP3's can be played on any compatible CD player 
- 02/01/07 9780786171682
$29.95
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Summary

From the author of Sun Storm comes this disturbing, entrancing, beautifully crafted mystery, winner of Sweden’s Best Crime Novel award and an international sensation.

It’s midsummer in Sweden, when the light lingers through dawn as the long winter finally ends. In this magical time, a brutal killer strikes, and the murder of a female priest sends shock waves through the community.

With no cause to get involved, attorney Rebecka Martinsson cannot help herself. And the further she is drawn into a mystery that will soon claim another victim, the more the dead woman’s world consumes her, a world of hurt and healing, sin and sexuality, and above all, of lethal sacrifice.

Review Quotes

“Fans of Henning Mankell, Karin Fossum and Arnaldur Indridason will be rewarded.”

Publishers Weekly

“The plot is as dark as a winter solstice. Larsson’s genius is her ability to enter the deranged criminal mind…The bleakness of the Swedish psyche is laid bare, and it is not a pretty thing.”

AudioFile

“Larsson…delivers plenty of suspense, but her real gift lies in her ability to climb inside the minds of her characters, analyzing their motivations for doing damage and good.”

Booklist (starred review)

“A virtuoso mood piece that works endless changes on its unforgiving landscape.”

Kirkus Reviews