Upstairs at the Roosevelts’ (audiobook)

Growing Up with Franklin and Eleanor

7.1 hrs • 6 CDs• 1 MP3 CD • Unabridged
Nonfiction/Biography & Autobiography
Target Audience: Adult
Release Date: 07/01/17
Title is unavailable in your country
FORMAT PURCHASED RELEASE ISBN PRICE ADD TO CART
Library CD Library Edition CD titles are packaged in an attractive, full-sized, durable vinyl case with full color art. Cloth Sleeves keep compact discs protected and in numerical order. 
- 07/01/17 9781470852504
$69.00
Out of stock
MP3 CD MP3-CDs: Come in a durable vinyl case similar to a dvd case. An index of contents and tracking information are included within the Mp3-CD format. MP3's can be played on any compatible CD player 
- 07/01/17 9781470852528
$29.95
Out of stock
Playaway Playaway: Playaway editions are a pre loaded audio device that is half the size of deck of cards. Simply plugin headphones and listen. 
- 07/01/17 9781538451618
$69.99
Out of stock

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Summary

Curtis Roosevelt knew what it was like to live with a president. His grandfather was Franklin Delano Roosevelt. From the time Curtis, with his sister Eleanor and recently divorced mother, Anna Roosevelt Dall, moved into his grandparents’ new home—the White House—Curtis played, learned, slept, ate, and lived in one of the most famous buildings in the world with one of its most famous residents.

Writing about his childhood from that perspective, Curtis Roosevelt offers anecdotes and revelations about the lives of the president and First Lady and the many colorful personalities in this presidential family. From Eleanor’s shocking role in the remarriage of Curtis’ mother to visits from naughty cousins and trips to the “Home Farm,” Upstairs at the Roosevelts’ provides an intimate perspective on the dynamics of one of America’s most famous families and those who visited, were friends, and sometimes even enemies.

Review Quotes

“Readers will enjoy seeing critical moments from the perspective of a child raised in a situation few of us could ever imagine.”

Library Journal

“This splendid, intimate memoir represents an invaluable addition to the literature of the Roosevelt era.”

Publishers Weekly on Too Close to the Suns